Contract Brewing

Here are excerpts and links to several articles on contract brewing…

“Some companies called beer marketing companies are not breweries at all but contract out all their brewing operations. They have no formal corporate facilities beyond an office, if that, but present themselves as a traditional brewery like any other. Examples of these marketing companies are Petes Wicked and Pabst Brewing; there are no longer any physical breweries for these companies.”

“For many brewers, contract brewing is a means to establish a brand and actually generate revenue before embarking on a fundraising and building program for a new brewery. With a larger brewery handling the brewing labor as a fee service, the brewery-to-be can better test the market and attract investors before committing hundreds of thousands of dollars to a new building or renovation program.”

“For some brewers, it is simply a logistical necessity. Hawaiis Kona Brewing finds it more cost-effective to contract their U.S. beers on the West Coast rather than ship everything produced from the islands. For others, it is a legal requirement: Due to a hindrance of Texas state law, Houstons Saint Arnold Brewing brews all the beers for the Texas locations of Californias brewpub chain BJs Restaurant & Brewhouse.”

-From Craft Beer USA

“Homebrewers are a lot like amateur musicians. Sooner or later, they begin thinking how much fun it would be to take their hobby to a professional level.”

-Article by Karl Bremer at Beernotes.com

And finally with a Beer Wars (the movie) twist…

“It turns out that New Century is based in Boston, but contract brewed by Lion in Wilkes Barre PA (nothing wrong with contract brewing per se, Sly Fox brews some fantastic beers for Southampton). New Century makes two beers, Edison, is a 4% ABV light lager sold in clear bottles and Moonshot 69 a caffeine infused golden lager (which has a 1.44 score on Beer Advocate). Are these really great examples of ‘creative and passionate’ craft beer? I have nothing against a light/crisp lager on a hot summer day or a rich caffeinated coffee stout on a cold winter night, but a light beer in a (skunk prone) clear bottle and a pils with 69 mg of pure caffeine added? Come on.”

From themadfermentationist.blogspot.com