The Glint in God’s Eye

Written by Ken Carman

Once trips around the moon started up again; long after the last trips in the 60s and 70s, an astronaut was snapping pictures of the surface when the lens caught a glint; a reflection, in a crater. Although they thought it might just be a solar flare playing tricks with the surface, or a camera problem, the astronaut said, “Hey! That looks like it should be called ‘The Glint in God’s Eye.'”

The name stuck.

Years past and every once in a while that same glint would be captured either by an astronaut seeing it, or a camera. Eventually they decided to find out what it was. By then trips to the surface had become common place. There were even finalizing plans to build a base. When a mission went to take better pictures, what they found made the news everywhere on Earh. In fact it shot around the world so fast the various digital broadcast waves got transmission burn.

This “glint” was not natural.

Alien? Well, that’s why they had sent a mission to check. It took a while to find it and it appeared to be very old, but very advanced: yet human made: a very sophisticated camera… far more sophisticated than current technology. In various languages the words embossed on the plaque put on it:”Do not move.” There were instructions on how to download.

So much we didn’t know.

So much we had wrong.

It had been focused in on Earth for a long time, taking brief clips once a year. The storage capacity was almost infinite. It even showed a planet Earth advanced far beyond what they had ever advanced as far as the astronauts knew.

Very puzzling.

Just before the end of the clips a scientist explained, “This has all happened before. During our loop we found a way to make this device. We think it will last into at least the next loop, at least according to how we understand time now. On September 28th, 2030, this is what happened…”

As they watched a giant meteor collide with Earth on the screen attached to recording device, the bright shining Earth above them seemed to dim. The very event that had just happened in the past as recorded on the device: now playing back on the screen, was repeating in real time. They also knew without being able to go back to Earth, they too would die without supplies.

…when trips around the moon started up again after the 60s and 70s an astronaut was snapping pictures of the surface when the lens caught a glint; a refelection, in a crater. Although they thought it just to be some solar flare playing tricks with the surface or a camera problem, the astronaut said, “That looks like that should be called ‘The Glint in God’s Eye.'”

The name stuck…
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Copyright 2009
Ken Carman
all rights reserved