Category Archives: Movies

Movie Review: Fahrenheit 11/9

Reviewed by Ken Carman for OEN

EONMovieFor those of you expecting this to be no more than some anti/pro-Moore partisan take here, sorry to disappoint. This is going to be as a Communications/Mass Media major and someone admittedly more familiar with editing back in the analog days of video/TV, and very familiar with digital sound editing: taking what many might consider worthless chaos and turning it into a song or composition. If editing does anything it gets to the point, emphasizes and reemphasizes the most important points. Editing brings the audience to some obvious conclusions and avoids getting the whole movie bogged down.

11/9: epic fail on all counts.

I have seen a few Moore movies. The best editing job I’ve seen was 9/11, with definite caveats: ‘from what I remember and the movies I’ve seen.’ The worst was, well, 11/9. It’s not just that it’s an attempt to ride on the back of 9/11: I’ll give Moore somewhat of a pass there. Obviously the intent was to do that, I just wish he had done it well. So much needed to be dumped on the editing floor for the sake of getting to the point. He never quite gets to answering the question he started the movie with, “How the… did this happen?” (Edited for brevity and, well, you know why.)

He spends a lot of time on the Flint water crisis. it was a valid addition, but not close to a quarter of the movie.

He blames himself. One might assume he blames Hillary, or at least those Democratic leadership folks who skewed it her way. One might assume he blames Bernie because he handed it off to Hillary. One might assume there’s at least a hint there of blaming it on Putin. One might assume a small part of blame goes to Obama. I have no objection to any of those, though I think some more valid than others, some not valid at all.

One might also assume he blames the states who voted Bernie but went to Hillary. There’s an important caveat here. If Bernie handed it to Hillary AFTER those votes were taken, valid point. If Bernie did that before the states voted, well, that depends on agreements between the two campaigns. Sometimes an agreement is reached to show solidarity. Hey, Michael, did you forget to show the timing here intentionally?

Somewhere on the editing floor was there anything on Election Fraud tactics and voter fraud? Whatever point of view he might take regarding either is not my point, it’s that one cannot deny both played a major role in the outcome. Massive amounts of voters were disenfranchised driven in part by claims of avoiding voter fraud: especially in crucial states that ended up giving the College to President Trump. Many were denied the vote. Many were only allowed to vote placebo: what some dare call “provisional.” One can only accurately refer to them as “provisional” if there is ever any intent to actually count them. A lot of claims have been made: unsubstantiated. Argue with someone who claims they’re counted if the election is close and demand proof you usually get nothing. Ask even if they ever are counted how are we to know they’re not counted in some biased manner: silence. I have argued this many times. Do you have the answer Michael? Inquiring: bored, movie goers needed to know.

So little on the Russian controversy? I’m not advocating for a position: either it’s all nonsense or we are at war with them and Trump is Putin’s puppet. Or anywhere between those two extremes. It’s just that this is all part of why some people ask, “How the… did this happen?” Take a stand, Mr. Moore.

Considering the popular vote v. College, v. number of those disenfranchised, v. the very close outcome of the election state by state, you simply can’t skip over all I’ve mentioned and find an answer to your question, Mr. Moore. Hell, you can’t even have a decent movie about it.

Hence the worst score I’ve handed out yet.

11/9 is both an editing and pacing mess. Unlike any other Moore movie I’ve seen I found myself squirming in my seat and I was glad when the credits rolled. If I hadn’t had many years of editing skills, college TV experience, years writing a column on the reoccurring topics part of 11/9, I might have walked out saying, “What was that all about?”

But I do know what it was supposed to be about.I sensed the direction he wanted to take the film, but Mr. Moore never quite got there. That has nothing to do with hating his movies, or loving them. It has to do with sloppy, maybe even careless, editing when it comes to content. Even the segues between topics were sloppy, careless, awkward, leaving a patron going, “Why this?” Could use a lot of fade on form: visual and especially content, instead of fade on, “What the…”.

We were the only patrons. I’m not surprised. I left feeling just like the movie theater: empty.

2.8

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Welcome to Our End of the New movie reviews. One poster: don’t bother. Two posters: eh, OK, but a lot of problems here. Three: Good movie, just at least one problem. Four: very good. Five: if you don’t go you’re missing out. Added comments at the end: “you could wait for it to come on TV,” “best seen on the big screen” and “good for all screens,” unless other comments are added, refer mainly to the nature of the movie such as special effects, incredible sound or scenery that might make it best seen in a movie theater depending on your set up at home.

Movie Review: Before I Fall

Reviewed by Ken Carman

EONMovieI have never given a 5 until now, and you would think a repeating day story would negate any possibility of a 5. But the storyline, and the message is that strong.

I know it’s not a new movie, and it’s hard to catch… at least on Direct TV. They play it at odd hours and hardly ever at night, Instead how about admittedly great movies like Independence Day ONE MORE TIIIIMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEE!!!!!

By the end you know what’s going to happen, but it doesn’t matter. I won’t spoil it for you. The teenage angst in this is superb: they nailed what it’s like. As one character says, and is repeated, it is but a blip in your life. But it’s one hell of a blip when, inside, emotions run raw and we don’t know how to handle ourselves, or others. Not that we ever get it right, we usually just do a lot more wrong in the earlier years.

Sam is a sweet teen who has fallen in with a group of girls run partially by a bully with attitude, but even she has her wonderful moments. At one point Sam tells her she loves he so much because she’s such a good friend she toilet papered a boy’s house for a week because he kept spreading the rumor Sam was a rotten kisser. Then we have the artistic, moody girl who used to be a friend but now Sam and friends torments her. There’s the boy she wants to “become a woman” with, an old, wonderful, childhood friend who really loves her, but has tried not to be pushy, tried to give her space.

You even know from the start she considers this the last day of her life. But what that means, well, we all learn.

It doesn’t need the big screen. The point is the story.

You would think by now the repeating day scenario would be so dried up it would turn to cinders and fly away. Before I Fall proves otherwise.

5

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Welcome to Our End of the New movie reviews. One poster: don’t bother. Two posters: eh, OK, but a lot of problems here. Three: Good movie, just at least one problem. Four: very good. Five: if you don’t go you’re missing out. Added comments at the end: “you could wait for it to come on TV,” “best seen on the big screen” and “good for all screens,” unless other comments are added, refer mainly to the nature of the movie such as special effects, incredible sound or scenery that might make it best seen in a movie theater depending on your set up at home.

Movie Review: Everything Everything

Reviewed by Ken Carman

EONMovieEverything, Everything isn’t a movie that has to have the big screen, though the beauty seen through the eyes of an 18 year old who has never been out of the house might be worth the big screen. Not necessary. The magic here is between the two stars (Amandla Stenberg as Maddy and Nick Robinson as Olly) who capture the sweetness of innocent love between two young, just barely, adults perfectly.

She finally escapes the house with her love beside her and that’s when the movie turns even more magical, a bit dark, then a secret is uncovered that shows how, even out of love, selfishness and those focused on controlling people can damage others. I won’t spoil that by being more specific.

There’s a metaphor, part simile, which is bothersome. A spacemen in a suit keeps appearing and, yes, the fact she feels trapped like a spaceman who can’t climb out of his spacesuit makes sense… sort of. But consecutive over usage not only wears it thin, but distracts from the story. At times the usage was so vague, was out of context, and was disturbing to the flow of an otherwise beautiful story I just wish they had kept it down to a time or two.

But this is a minor point for sure. A definite recommend for more of a B movie. Not a life changing one, but a good one for sure.

4.1

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Welcome to Our End of the New movie reviews. One poster: don’t bother. Two posters: eh, OK, but a lot of problems here. Three: Good movie, just at least one problem. Four: very good. Five: if you don’t go you’re missing out. Added comments at the end: “you could wait for it to come on TV,” “best seen on the big screen” and “good for all screens,” unless other comments are added, refer mainly to the nature of the movie such as special effects, incredible sound or scenery that might make it best seen in a movie theater depending on your set up at home.

Movie Review: Passengers

Courtesy youtube.com

Reviewed by Ken Carman

EONMoviePassengers is the best movie of 2016, and maybe 2017. I’m not kidding. Passengers has everything: romance, betrayal, an impossible situation, SciFi mystique, great storytelling and a few slight twists. Oh, and I absolutely recommend 3D, unlike the other, higher attended, movie that screened at the same time: Rogue. The big screen may not be mandatory: if Passengers shows up on TV I will see it again and again. But you lose quite a bit without it.

Rogue is a good movie too, but offers nothing worth paying the price for 3D. You would think that the stars, the spaceships; something would have stood out, been impressive in a 3D way, come right at you. Nothing.

Not so with Passengers. As the two lonely, stranded, stars spacewalk the stars jump right out at you with incredible beauty, and the curvature of the spaceship gives you a sense you’re there.
That alone would be just interesting, but the script has some mildly unpredictable moments: a great feat considering the subject matter lends itself to predictability. There’s a moment in the movie I do take issue with. Something happens that Jennifer Lawrence likens to “murder.” I won’t spoil the moment by saying what, but it’s more akin to rape, in my opinion: rape beyond just body violation; something damn near impossible to forgive. How they handle that, while leaving the integrity of both characters, could have so easily turned cheesy, even offensive. The transition to the grand finale was perfect, touching.

Kudos, script writers, you navigated that as deftly as the stars worked the problem of a ship that had serious glitches.

This is the highest score I’ve given a movie so far…

4.7

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Welcome to Our End of the New movie reviews. One poster: don’t bother. Two posters: eh, OK, but a lot of problems here. Three: Good movie, just at least one problem. Four: very good. Five: if you don’t go you’re missing out. Added comments at the end: “you could wait for it to come on TV,” “best seen on the big screen” and “good for all screens,” unless other comments are added, refer mainly to the nature of the movie such as special effects, incredible sound or scenery that might make it best seen in a movie theater depending on your set up at home.

Movie Review: Rogue One


Image courtesy lrmonline.com

Reviewed for PGA by Ken Carman

EONMovieRight from the start, obviously this was a story that needed to be told: the stealing of the plans for the Death Star. The character development is excellent, although some things that need explaining are left unmentioned or barely skimmed over. It is told quite well, otherwise. The Empire’s droid who has been reprogrammed even provides grand comic relief, the blind ninja a Jedi tinge to it all and a Genghis Kahn-like character is somewhat Han Solo-ish. The father and daughter tie the movie is somewhat based on brings her around to being a hero from just being out to save herself,

We went to Regal’s 3D RPX theater. The “RPX” was interesting: bigger screen, more powerful speakers and plenty of them. But 3D? The movie, not for one moment, gave any indication 3D was needed, nor the extra cost for it. What a waste.

Apparently Disney has decide to do side stories every other year, then continue from Episode 7 to 8 the the next in alternate years. Lucas Films wasa wise purchase, for sure.

You do get to care about the characters and the end had a Pompeii feel to it. I won’t spoil it for you by going deeper into that comment, and pretty much anything else might spoil it.

See it on the big screen. Skip the 3D unless it doesn’t cost extra.

4

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Welcome to Our End of the New movie reviews. One poster: don’t bother. Two posters: eh, OK, but a lot of problems here. Three: Good movie, just at least one problem. Four: very good. Five: if you don’t go you’re missing out. Added comments at the end: “you could wait for it to come on TV,” “best seen on the big screen” and “good for all screens,” unless other comments are added, refer mainly to the nature of the movie such as special effects, incredible sound or scenery that might make it best seen in a movie theater depending on your set up at home.

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